What are you searching for?

We’re excited to launch our upgraded Search tool for the OCW website. As always, the search bar is in the upper right corner of the top menu. But there are many improvements under the hood.

For instance, start typing and you’ll now see “autocomplete” suggestions. If you like one of them, click it to go straight to the result.

Screenshot of OCW homepage, with "game" typed into search bar, and several autocomplete suggestions dropped down below.

Here’s the first few results for “games for learning.” Note that the results default to show entire courses that match the search string. You can also broaden the search to include all types of files plus entire courses, or filter results to just PDFs, or just assessment content (assignments + exams + projects).

Screenshot of search results for "games for learning," set to display courses.

If you’re an educator, use this search to find courses and teaching materials on a particular topic, and then click the Instructor Insights tab to learn more about how MIT instructors teach on this topic.

Screenshot of search results for "games for learning," set to display instructor insights.

The more you use it, the better it will get! We hope you’ll give the new site Search tool a try, and please do let us know how it’s working for you.

MIT OpenCourseWare videos on YouTube have been restored

MIT OpenCourseWare’s videos on YouTube, which had been blocked around the world since last Thursday evening, are once again viewable.

Just before midnight (EDT) on Thursday June 14, over 5,000 OCW videos on YouTube — including classroom lectures, MIT faculty interviews, and student project presentations — were suddenly blocked to viewers all around the world. Visitors to the OCW channel on the YouTube website, or on the YouTube app, saw an error message: “This video contains content from MIT. It is not available in your country.

While this error message implied that the blockage was somehow dependent on the viewer’s country, we believe the blockage was worldwide.

Visitors to the OCW website, where these videos are embedded within course webpages, got a similar error message that videos could not be played.

OCW immediately requested help from YouTube Support to fix the issue.

On Monday June 18, the YouTube team informed OCW that the videos would be restored upon approving a new “Subscription Offerings Amendment” to our YouTube Partner Agreement. After discussions between MIT and YouTube legal teams, an approved agreement is now in place.

We are glad that YouTube has restored access to OCW’s videos. YouTube has long been a valued partner to OCW in freely sharing our open course materials around the world. We look forward to working with YouTube to ensure that our content remains available to all, without barriers.

NOTE: This post was updated on June 25, 2018, to reflect the approved agreement between MIT and YouTube.

Statement on OCW Videos Blocked on YouTube

At around midnight on June 14, a number of OCW videos on YouTube suddenly became unavailable for many learners.  Instead, they saw the following message from YouTube: “This video contains content from MIT. It is not available in your country.”

As of 3:00pm EDT Monday June 18, we still don’t have a solution.  Learners from the United States, India, China, Egypt, Belgium, Serbia, Kazakhstan – from all around the world – are still unable to access this MIT content. YouTube support is investigating the issue, and we eagerly await a fix.

Media reports show that OCW is not alone in this video blocking problem. Among others, it’s hit the popular YouTube channels of Blender, India’s Press Information Bureau, Czech soccer club AC Sparta Praha, and England Rugby.

We are deeply concerned about the blocking of these videos, as we know that so many OCW visitors rely on this content every day. We appreciate how the YouTube platform has allowed OCW to reach millions of learners from around the globe for free, consistent with our mission: to freely and openly share MIT course materials with the world.

While our YouTube videos are blocked, you can still access our videos through iTunes and the Internet Archive, via links on the OCW pages hosting each video.

We appreciate the outpouring of concern from our global community of passionate learners and educators. You’re the reason we’re here!

We’ll continue to work with YouTube to ensure that our videos are restored and accessible to all, without any barriers.

The Facts Don’t Speak for Themselves

Graphic with thin vertical color bands going from dark blue to lighter to red.

What story do you get from this visualization of annual global temperatures from 1850-2017? (Image: Ed Hawkins, License CC BY-SA)

By Joe Pickett, OCW Publication Director

Big data is the signature feature of the Information Age. It reveals patterns we could never see before, patterns in consumer behavior, medical treatments, weather events, just about anything we can think of.

But those patterns have to be discerned, and their stories shaped before they can have an impact.

Shaped how? By collection and presentation methods, and then by researchers who interpret and explain what they have discovered.

Or so says Rahul Bhargava, the instructor of CMS.631 Data Storytelling Studio: Climate Change, a course just published on OCW:

“…The idea that facts could ever speak for themselves is a total misunderstanding of data. Everything from data collection (decisions about “who counts”) to presentation (choices about what kind of chart to use, where the vertical axis starts, what colors to use, etc.) comprise rhetorical decisions that change how someone understands what you’ve done. The minute you make the smallest decision about how to gather or present information, you’ve already turned data into speech. It’s not objective truth; it’s rhetoric.”

So if you want to use data to change the world, you need to devise a compelling argument. How to formulate and share that argument is the subject of this course, which uses climate change as its special focus.

The OCW course site has a full set of readings, lecture slides and notes, plus a variety of assignments to foster creative thinking.

Webpage screenshot with martini glass image, "The Olive," and photo of young blond white woman in exercise clothes.

This student project shows that satire and data do mix!

Sample coursework highlights how the students put their learning into practice, including a board game about the refugee experience, an online quiz about bikeshare programs, and a satire in the style of The Onion whose humor points are backed by creative data presentations.

Teaching with a Compass instead of a Map

Photo of a smiling man standing by desk and workspace, looking to the side.

Instructor Rahul Bhargava.

CMS.631 has its roots in workshops taught by Bhargava, and needless to say, teaching students who spend a lot of their time working on projects requires a flexible, somewhat improvisational approach. As Bhargava explains in one of his Instructor Insights:

“The Data Storytelling Studio is a compass-led course. I point students in the right direction, and then follow where they go. My role is to be with them on the journey to make sure they don’t fall into a giant crevasse…I’m definitely the guide in the classroom and I’m in charge of the course, there’s no question about that. But I respect and honor the skills that students bring into the classroom. It’s an essential part of the course design.”

In other Insights, Bhargava shares tips for building student confidence in working with data and for getting students to work productively in teams.  He notes further how he engages participation by having students create “data sculptures” with craft materials and by getting them to write in a common blogspace.

In their own series of Insights, several students identify the data storytelling techniques they found most compelling, and they offer their advice for future students and educators.

We think it makes a fabulous success story! But don’t take it from us. Look at the data yourself!

Go deep with oceanographer Carl Wunsch

Photo of a smiling man in front of a chalkboard covered in math and diagrams.

Carl Wunsch, the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physical Oceanography (Emeritus) in MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences. (Photo by Helen Hill.)

Like many scientific fields, oceanography has gone through big changes in recent decades. It’s been blessed with more high-quality data and powerful computing, leading to more accurate oceanographic models and underlying theories. It’s going through culture shifts, e.g. from male-dominated to one where women are increasingly prominent. And as oceanography has been central to our growing scientific understanding of climate change, it’s thoroughly embedded in the science communication challenges and cultural debate around this curiously contentious issue.

Wouldn’t it be great to hear an insider’s perspective on the evolving science and all these changes?

Let MIT professor Carl Wunsch be our guide. With a career starting in the mid-1960s, Professor Wunsch “is at the heart of many of the major advances in modern physical oceanography,” writes Nature climate science editor Michael White.

Professor Wunsch is the latest guest on Michael White’s “Forecast” podcast, which features long format interviews with climate scientists about climate science. Their conversation is a captivating “one-stop history of the field, and a deeply personal insight into how major science questions are conceptualized and addressed,” full of rich stories about the science, and the personalities, conflicts and connections, that make this world turn.

You can also learn some oceanography directly from Wunsch’s two courses on OCW – 12.842 Climate Physics and Chemistry and 12.864 Inference from Data and Models – and his popular online textbook Evolution of Physical Oceanography (also free on OCW). These are just a few of OCW’s extensive oceanography resources.

> Listen to “Carl Wunsch and the rise of modern oceanography” on the Forecast podcast.

Python Programming for the Puzzled

In this course, we use Python to solve a variety of puzzles. Two of the puzzles involve the game of chess. (Image by Brett Paci at MIT OpenCourseWare.)

By Joe Pickett, OCW Publication Director

Python Programming for the Puzzled

Those Sudoku number grids that look so easy but can be so exasperating—wouldn’t it be great to write a program that can solve every one of them?

Imagine you’re a magician, and your neat trick is to read the minds of the people in the audience. They’ve seen some cards pulled from a deck. You boast that you can read their minds and pick the fifth card, which is amazing, because you’ve already missed the first four! How can you pull this trick off?

The bike rack on your car has gotten loose and needs to be re-secured. All you need is a bolt and a nut that match the size of a hole in a metal tube. Luckily, you’ve got lots of bolts and nuts in a couple of jars on a shelf. Maybe it’s finally time to see which bolts and nuts fit together. But you don’t have all day. You need to get this done quickly. You’re meeting up with friends  . . .

Solving Algorithmic Puzzles with Python

These vexing challenges might seem about as different from each other as can be, but the puzzles they present are all solvable by algorithms and a little Python programming!

That’s right—you can program magic, and mechanics, and Sudoku grids right from your home computer. All you need is a little help from Professor Srini Devadas, now available in his course 6.S095 Programming for the Puzzled.

Taught during the IAP period of January 2018, the course has on its OCW site full video lectures, a prose description of each puzzle challenge, the necessary Python code, and the solution to the puzzle.

Professor Devadas is a master at making programming fun by tying it to real-world conundrums. He’s won an MIT MacVicar Fellowship for being such a great teacher, and in this course he’s at the top of his game.

Professor Srini Devadas begins his explanation of how he “read” the minds of the class in the “You Can Read Minds” puzzle.

There’s a square courtyard you have to tile. It should be an easy job, only the tile you’ve been given isn’t square. It’s L-shaped. And there’s this statue that you’ll have to work around. Don’t fret! Professor Devadas has the magic formula!

How can you place eight queens on a chessboard such that no queen attacks any other? How about if you have a chessboard of any size and a number of queens matching that board’s number of columns or rows? You don’t have to be a chess master to solve this one!

Professor Devadas knows how to foster creative thinking with programming, and the puzzles he unravels will surely lead his students to solve even more mind-bending puzzles in the future.

Good Vibrations Making Big Waves

Photo of water drop rebounding off surface of water, with several circular waves rolling out.

Vibrations and waves caused by water drops. (Image courtesy of erwan bazin on Flickr. License CC BY-NC-SA.)

By Joe Pickett, OCW Publication Director

Good, good, good, good vibrations . . . are not just fundamental to love, but to the structure of the universe itself.

In fact, “without waves and vibrations, we would not be able to even recognize this universe,” says Professor Yen-Jie Lee, in his introductory video to Physics III: 8.03SC Vibrations and Waves, a course just published on OCW. Think about it: light, sound, brain activity, and even gravitation all involve vibrations and waves. These phenomena are everywhere. To understand them is to understand the universe.

The latest OCW Scholar course, 8.03SC has a tsunami of resources for those interested in discovering the physics that describe these phenomena. The course site has full video lectures, lecture notes, problem sets, exams with solutions, and a free online textbook. A second series of videos by Professor Wit Busza shows how to think about and solve problems.

Like other Scholar courses, 8.03SC is arranged sequentially, by learning units, so you can progress through the semester just the way Professor Lee’s students did. But there’s also a handy resource index to help you quickly zero in on specific resources that might be of interest.

As the description says, “This course will provide you with the concepts and mathematical tools necessary to understand and explain a broad range of vibrations and waves. You will learn that waves come from many interconnected (coupled) objects when they are vibrating together. We will discuss many of these phenomena, along with related topics, including mechanical vibrations and waves, sound waves, electromagnetic waves, optics, and gravitational waves.”

Demos to Make It Real

Man gesturing at a table with a wave demonstration apparatus, saying "Let's see what is going to happen."

Professor Lee conducts one of his many in-class demonstrations which are part of the course videos.

In most lectures, Professor Lee conducts reality-checks for the mathematics he presents by including a variety of physical demonstrations. You’ll see how sound waves can propagate across different systems, how a moonwalk works by having one wave moving forward over another moving backward, how optical fiber transmission is made possible by the way light waves bounce off surfaces, and much, much more. For user convenience, each lecture section also lists the demos separately, so you can go directly to the demos if you like.

Insights into How It Is Taught

In his video Instructor Insights, Professor Lee explains why these demonstrations are so important, how he weaves them into his lectures, and how they must be carefully staged before each lecture. In other insights, he shares further pedagogic stratagems, like how he uses humor to enliven his lectures and reinforce student learning, how he employs questionnaires to adjust the pace of the course to the particular mix of students in a given class, and how and why he has changed the course from the way it was previously taught.

So why not explore 8.03SC? You might catch a wave and find that you’re sitting on top of the world!