The Commons rejoices: 375,000 new images from the Met

Photo of ceramic statue of a person, smilling with arms upraised.

This Smiling Figure from the Remojadas region of Veracruz is a hollow ceramic sculpture representing an individual celebrating with music and dance. (License CC 0, from the Metropolitan Museum.)

It’s a great day for art and the Commons!

Today, the Metropolitan Museum of Art unveiled a new Open Access policy for 375,000 images from their permanent collection – spanning 5,000 years of history, from antiquities to photography, and including images otherwise unavailable to view within the museum itself. These images (and their metadata) are provided under the public domain Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license.

Begin to explore the bounty by visiting their Collection page, and selecting the “Public Domain Artworks” filter in the left-hand column.

Learn more about the program, including their partnerships with Artstor, Wikimedia Foundation, Digital Public Library of America, ITHAKA, and Creative Commons, in this Facebook Live video of the announcement.

We look forward to these great artworks enlivening our course home pages, social media posts, and within our course materials. From all of us at MIT OpenCourseWare, and on behalf of our millions of learners around the globe, thank you Met and all those who made this gift possible.

Over one billion works use Creative Commons

Graph of # of work vs. years, showing dramatic increase.

Creative Commons licensed works have nearly tripled in the past 5 years, recently exceeding 1 Billion total works. (Image courtesy of Creative Commons, license CC BY 4.0)

Open sharing? We couldn’t do it without you, Creative Commons.

Since OCW adopted a Creative Commons license in 2004, we’ve shared materials from thousands of MIT courses with hundreds of millions of people around the world. All those pageviews, file downloads, remixes and translations, and passing along to friends and colleagues have been enabled by Creative Commons’ clear and widely-accepted terms of use.

Today, Creative Commons announced a major milestone: over 1 billion works have been licensed using Creative Commons since the organization’s founding, and the size of the commons has nearly tripled in the past five years alone. Read more about Creative Commons’ impressive growth and impact in their just-released 2015 State of the Commons Report.

Creators are choosing to share many of their works with the world, free of or with limited restrictions, to support global collaboration. MIT OpenCourseWare is proud to support the Creative Commons’ vision of the world, and proud of our contributions to this vibrant community powered by collaboration and gratitude. The benefits are a world of free and open content that creates more equity, access, and innovation for everyone.

A Masterwork in Simplicity: The Story of the CC Logo (CreativeCommons.org)

Photo of a museum exhibit hall, with the on/off symbol and Creative Commons logos on the wall.

Creative Commons logo and installation view of MOMA’s exhibit “This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good” by Jim.Henderson. Copyright and related rights waived via CC0.

New York’s Museum of Modern Art has a new exhibit, “This is For Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good,” that’s close to the heart for all of us in the open education movement.  The Creative Commons blog reports:

Displayed on the white walls next to the internationally embraced symbols for the on/off button, recycling, and the @ symbol, one will find a mark of equally great significance: the “double-C in a circle,” or simply, the “CC,” Creative Commons mark.

This most visible icon of the free culture movement is on view in the exhibit, but the MoMA took even further steps to recognize the impact and importance of the “CC” logo and its accompanying ShareAlike, NonCommercial, Attribution, and NoDerivatives icons. On March 4, 2015 MoMA Senior Curator Paolo Antonelli announced that the Creative Commons logo had been formally acquired as part of the museum’s permanent collection. It is both a symbolic and very practical kind of acquisition. As part of the collection, the icons and their history will enjoy perpetual protection and recognition by MoMA. But their work is far from complete: like so many of the other instantly-recognizable icons in the MoMA collection, the “CC” logo will continue to be used and appreciated by millions of people in millions of situations, and for many years to come.

Read the full story of the CC logo here, written by Jay Walsh in collaboration with Creative Commons staff.

Public Domain Jam! (Creative Commons blog)

The Wizard of Oz; Moby Dick; Alice in Wonderland. These characters (and many, many others) are in the public domain, and are free to be remixed and remade… into videogames. Creative Commons blogged about the Public Domain Jam, a cool videogame design contest with a $1000 prize for the best game released into the public domain:

If you’re a videogame designer and you have nothing to do over the next week (or if making cool games is more fun than your day job), why not spend the week developing a public domain game?

The idea of The Public Domain Jam is to encourage developers to create games based on public domain assets and stories, and optionally give the games themselves back to the public domain via the CC0 waiver. The game trailer encourages designers to think about the amazing wealth of public domain source material. Read more

 

The contest ends on Saturday, so hurry! And don’t forget to check out our list of game-related courses on OCW.

11th Annual Open Education Conference call for proposals now open

opened2014-logoIt’s that time of year – planning is underway for the 11th annual family reunion of the Open Education family, and we hope that you’re planning for it, too.

Call for Proposals is Now Open!

The CFP submission process calls for tweet-sized abstracts and brief descriptions of 500 or fewer words. Learn more about the conference themes and then submit a proposal! Connect your content, research, tools, methods, advocacy, badges, policies, and other work with the rest of the field.

Copyright meets Internet (The Harvard Gazette)

The Harvard Gazette recently published an excellent write-up on the complicated issues surrounding copyright and fair use in the MOOC environment.  Here’s a taste of the piece:

…the Copyright Act and its accompanying legal guidelines has long provided those in higher education with a right of exception, letting educators reproduce copyrighted works as long as the material does not exceed fair use and is, in recent decisions, “transformative to the educational experience.”

“The concept of ‘transformative fair use’ allows the use of copyrighted material in a manner, or for a purpose, that differs from the original use in such a way that the expression, meaning, or message is essentially new,” Courtney said.

Yet with drag-and-drop technologies and the ability to cut and paste entire books or images, there are an increasing number of caveats. Faculty members are not just grappling with the fair-use question by reinterpreting “transformative use” in their lectures, they are also pioneering new kinds of collaborations with publishers for their traditional syllabus materials. Moreover, the explosion of online learning, experimental by nature, has proven a natural breeding ground for such test cases.  Read more.

These are issues that were confronted a number of years ago in the OpenCourseWare community, and—through the leadership of MIT OpenCourseWare’s Intellectual Property Manager Lindsey Weeramuni and otherscode_large_7_july_11—resulted in the development of a Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for OpenCourseWare, which has served the community well as a standard of shared practice in this domain.  The code is one of a number developed by the Center for Media and Social Impact at American University.

Harvard Professor Settles Fair-Use Dispute With Record Label (Chronicle of Higher Ed)

Harvard Professor Settles Fair-Use Dispute With Record Label

An Australian record label has agreed that a Harvard University law professor’s use of a popular song in a lecture that was posted online constituted fair use of the material, as part of a settlement that ends a legal dispute between the two parties

The record label agreed that Mr. Lessig’s use of the song was fair use, and said it would “amend its copyright and YouTube policy to ensure that mistakes like this will not happen again.” Read more.