Robert Talbert – Getting off on the right foot in an inverted calculus class (Chronicle of Higher Ed)

Here’s an excerpt from the  sixth post in from Robert Talbert’s excellent series on flipping his calculus class:

Getting off on the right foot in an inverted calculus class

In the previous post about the flipped/inverted calculus class, we looked at getting student buy-in for the flipped concept, so that when they are asked to do Guided Practice and other such assignments, they won’t rebel (much). When you hear people talk about the flipped classroom, much of the time the emphasis is on what happens before class – the videos, how to get students to do the reading, and so on. But the real magic is what happens in class when students come, prepared with some basic knowledge they’ve acquired for themselves, and put it to work with their peers on hard problems.

But before this happens, there’s an oddly complex buffer zone that students and instructors have to cross, and that’s the time when students arrive at the class meeting. Really? you are thinking. How can arrival to class be such a complicated thing? They show up, you get to work, right? Well – not so fast. There are of number of things you have to get right in this period at the beginning of class. Read more.

 

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