Look What Happened Over the Holidays

Screenshot of OCW homepage, with "For Educators" dropdown menu exposed.

Did you notice? There’s a new tab at the top of the OCW homepage: For Educators!

Under this tab, we’ve collected all OCW and OCW-related resources that are of special interest to educators—and really anyone interested in education.

So please take a look and explore this side of OCW. You’re bound to make new discoveries!

The Year is Ending, but these Teaching Insights are Fresh

By Sarah Hansen, OCW Educator Project Manager

MIT instructors share their teaching approaches in a special section of their OCW courses, called “Instructor Insights.” In these sections, you’ll find instructors discussing topics of interest to education professionals, such as course design, active learning, and engaging learners.

The year may be coming to a close, but we’ve recently published 11 courses with new Instructor Insights—and they are super fresh! Below are a few highlights:

Find something you like? Share directly to Facebook using our “Share Quote” feature.

And if you like these, there’s many others in our collection of all OCW courses with Instructor Insights.

Serving you and millions of learners ✏

“I am a computer enthusiast and I always
wanted to attend an institute of higher
level, but then I found a job with shift
work very hard, which does not allow me
to attend.

In addition, the high costs that I could
not support, having lost my dad at 13 and
having to help with household expenses,
were prohibitive.

So I decided to remain a self learner and
I went in against a big problem: which
sources are reliable and which are not?

Internet is immense and the risk of
getting the wrong information is high …

As I became aware of MIT OPENCOURSEWARE
I was delighted to find an authoritative
source where I could find a lot of
information for free. It’s really a
fantastic idea and I thank all the
teachers who volunteered to share
their knowledge.”

-Alessandro, Independent Learner, Italy

 

Dear Friend of OCW,

It’s a privilege for us at OCW to serve enthusiastic learners like Alessandro and millions of others who look for free and reliable educational resources to support their educational pursuits.

Please consider OCW in your end-of-year giving so that we can continue to openly share MIT materials with a world of people seeking to refresh their knowledge, learn something new, or gain the understanding they need to fulfill their life goals.

Your donation, large or small, will help us to keep publishing and distributing the educational materials that make a difference to learners everywhere.

Why not be part of OCW’s effort to advance learning? If you can, please support OCW today.

Sincerely,

Joe

Joseph Pickett
Publication Director
MIT OpenCourseWare

 

ocwbythenumbers2

Nine-Day Workshops with Lessons to Last You a Lifetime

Collage of four photos showing students working on and showing their electronics systems.

Students in an electronics workshop that features Arduino microcontrollers collaborate to design a prototype. (Image courtesy of Andrew Ringler.)

By Joe Pickett, OCW Publication Director

You’ve got the month of January off from regular classes, and you want to do more than sleep in. It’s a good time to experiment, to do something unusual, maybe create a software project. But what if you don’t really have the background for this sort of thing?

Sign up for a workshop that requires no experience at all!

Two such workshops taught by the same instructor have just appeared on OCW site: Collaborative Design and Creative Expression with Arduino Microcontrollers and Learn to Build Your Own Videogame with the Unity Game Engine and Microsoft Kinect.

In the Arduino workshop, students in small teams create different projects using Arduino microcontrollers, including a hand-motion controlled “car,” dazzling light displays, and a punching glove that measures the intensity of its blows.

In the Videogame workshop, student teams create videogames in which the player moves and controls an object in space by body motions: animals try to escape from a zoo, cubes assemble to build and decorate houses, objects traverse landscapes full of obstacles.

The OCW workshop sites have videos of class activities and student-narrated projects, so you can see what the students did and how they thought about what they made.

Fostering Learner Self-Confidence

What these workshops have in common is an unconventional teaching methodology championed by Kyle Keane and Andrew Ringler, two of the instructors, and shared in their Instructor Insights for the Arduino and the Videogame workshop. Each set of Insights is tailored to the demands of that particular workshop.

The main goal for the workshops is to help students build confidence so they can gain independence from their instructors and learn on their own. To do this, they employ a variety of techniques to shake students out of their accustomed ways of thinking about learning and creativity, so they can move forward and be productive.

Building Productive Teams

To work with a team you first have to get on one, and to do that, it helps to know which people seem best suited as teammates. The workshop employs some techniques used in improv comedy to get people familiar with one another fast. Keane explains:

I use improv warm up exercises (games performers play to get ready for a show) to help participants explore how verbal and nonverbal communication impact their collaborative relationships in the workshop.

He encourages students to explore different possible teams and to not be afraid to move out of one and join another. With little or no experience, students are bound to make impractical suggestions and show a certain degree of ignorance.

Modeling Vulnerability

To help defuse student’s fear of embarrassment, Keane shares his own, and in doing so he models vulnerability, which

…is not a very common post-secondary teaching strategy, but…it’s an important thing to do when building team dynamics, because, let’s face it, opening yourself up to critique is terrifying…So, as instructors…we stand in the front of the classroom and talk about how it feels to be vulnerable. We’re weirdly explicit about it, but we find it extremely effective.

Going hand in hand with this technique is showing (rather than telling) students that it’s OK to ask for help: “It’s better to coach them and to model how to bring in others to solve problems.”

Being Creative, Not Original

In a nine-day workshop, there is hardly time to reinvent the wheel, yet in conceiving a creative project, students often think that’s what they have to do. To defuse this dynamic, Keane reframes the creative process away from being completely original to building on existing ideas and taking them in new directions. So the workshop

…involves students mimicking, step-by-step, projects that have already been built and then deviating from them—to give students permission to build on existing work.

Failing on Purpose

At the same time, to get students comfortable with risk-taking Keane gives them “assignments that ask students to do the impossible (like build a video game in six hours as a team, for example).”

These present opportunities for learning how to work with people having very different skills:

Participants don’t truly understand they need to collaborate with people who bring different skill sets to the work until they fail at a project…[Failure] helps drive home the importance of working in groups of people with diverse interests and abilities.

In Keane’s view, if a project is “designed to fail,” it holds the potential for longer-term success:

If it’s a designed-to-fail project…you pick something that’s kind of kooky that you want to learn, because no one’s going to know that you overstretched your skill set and tried something that was outside of your range. In this workshop, we explicitly allow (and encourage) participants to take these risks.

Moreover, doomed projects

…free participants to do things they might consider ridiculous, crazy, or imaginative. If you know the project is not intended to be successful, why not stretch your perceived boundaries?

Indeed, why not?

Happiness is filtered sorted course lists

Hot on the heels of last week’s announcement of our new Facebook “Share Quote” tool, we’re excited to unveil an even bigger OCW site enhancement: dynamic sorting and filtering on course lists.

If you’ve spent any time on OCW, you’ve seen these lists. We have several different kinds, to suit different ways of finding courses. Whether you’re browsing by topic, going straight to a particular MIT department like Economics, perusing one of our highlights collections such as the newest courses, or exploring a cross-disciplinary subject like the environment, you’ll find course lists all over the OCW site.

And with over 2400 courses now on OCW, some of these lists have become quite long!

Now you can filter any list to show only those courses with particular types of content – such as complete lecture notes, videos, or example student projects – and also reorder the list to display most recent courses first, rather than in ascending course number sequence.

Say you’re interested in game design. On the Find by Topic page, under the Fine Arts > Game Design subtopic, you’ll currently find a list of 22 OCW courses.

If you’re specifically looking for recent examples of student game design projects, 22 courses might be too many to go through one-by-one. As shown in the animation above: click the ‘Student projects’ content filter and the list reduces to just 10 courses; sort the list by ‘Most Recent First,’ and your most relevant course moves to the top of the list.

We’re confident this enhancement will sweeten your OCW experience. Please check it out and let us know!

Inspire your network with our new “Share Quote” feature

When you read something that’s inspiring, do you want to spread the word?  We hope so!

OCW’s growing collection of Instructor Insights pages is chock full of inspiring ideas for educators, where MIT faculty talk about how they teach. Our brand-new Facebook “Share Quote” tool makes it easy to share your favorite nuggets from these pages.

Simply highlight any text on an Instructor Insights page. When the “Share Quote” bubble pops up, click on it, and a Facebook post window pre-filled with your selected quote will appear. Add optional commentary, click the “Post to Facebook” button, and you’re done!

Good Food, Good Teaching

An illustration of several game dishes on white plates.

This illustration of several game dishes from Mrs. Beeton’s Book of Household Management (1861) adorns the home page of the new OCW course 21L.707 Reading Cookbooks: from the Form of Cury to the Smitten Kitchen. (Image courtesy of Wellcome Images. License CC BY.)

By Joe Pickett, OCW Publication Director

The year-end holiday season is fast approaching! Soon families and friends everywhere will be celebrating, with meals as the centerpiece of the festivities.

What better time to explore OCW’s fabulous collection of courses on food and cooking?

These courses have fascinating reading lists, ingenious assignments, and links to a full pantry of resources on the internet.

Let’s start with a couple of delicacies on the OCW site that are, well, fresh out of the oven:

And here are some more dishes on the cultural aspects of what we eat and how we prepare it:

  • 21A.265 Food and Culture taught by Professor Heather Paxson
    What’s the connection between what we eat and who we are? How are personal identities and social groups formed via food production, preparation, and consumption? Readings are the staple of critical discussions around what makes “good” food good.
  • 21W.730-4 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about Cultures of Food taught by Dr. Karen Boiko
    This course explores many of the issues that surround food as both material fact and personal and cultural symbol. The class reads and discusses essays on such topics as family meals, eating as an “agricultural act,” slow food, and food’s ability to awaken us to “our own powers of enjoyment.”  Writing assignments tap into personal memories and reflections on the assigned essays.
  • 21H.S01 Food in American History taught by Anya Zilberstein
    This course looks at food in modern American history as a story of industrialization and globalization. Topics include: slave plantations and factory farm labor; industrial processing and technologies of food preservation; the political economy and ecology of global commodity chains; the vagaries of nutritional science; food restrictions and reform movements; food surpluses and famines; cooking traditions and innovations; the emergence of restaurants, supermarkets, fast food, and slow food.

And what MIT collection would be complete without some fully hands-on approaches to the subject?

  • ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry taught by Dr. Patricia Christie
    This seminar investigates cooking on a scientific basis. Each week students do an edible experiment and look at the science behind how it all works. Assignments range from “Guacamole, salsa, make your own hot sauce, and quesadillas” to “Scones and coffee” and “Jams and jellies” to “Pasta, meatballs, and crème brulée.”
  • ES.S16 Advanced Kitchen Chemistry taught by Dr. Patricia Christie
    This more sophisticated seminar features a weekly edible experiment that explores a specific food topic. Aside from these scrumptious assignments, the course site has links to resources such as Health benefits of chocolate, Flow diagram of cheese making, History of tofu, and Everything you did not want to ask about root beer.
  • ES.S41 Speak Italian with Your Mouth Full taught by Dr. Paola Rebusco
    If you want to learn a language, what better place to be than the kitchen?  For each class in this course, a different dish is prepared, while students ingest bite-sized pieces of the Italian language and culture.  By the end, students are able to cook some healthy and tasty recipes and understand and speak basic Italian. The course site includes instructional videos both on language and on cooking. Mangia!